9.6.12

Do children have macro lens eyes?




























































I remember delving deeply into everything.

Collecting pooka snails and ordering them about as they emerged from their shells. Harvesting rose petals and creating watery concoctions to extract their sweet essence. Adding mint leaves into mucky stews and serving them up to the dog.......

Leaving special gifts for the little people. A rhyme wrapped up in a chestnut skin, just the way they would like it. A doll's tea-set cup full of the juice of blackberries, squashed under a stone and decorated with beads from a treasured bracelet.

Elaborate offerrings to entice the faeries out to play.

When the raindrops settled, I saw them in there, dancing and flying about on spectrum coloured wings. Do children have macro lens eyes? Is that the magic we are reminded of when we magnify our world so that all it's ethereal detail is revealed and we are once again enthralled?











17 comments:

  1. Such profound observations accompanying these incredible pictures...when I retire and spend some quality time with my camera, I hope I am a tenth as talented as you....wonderful post!

    I do believe we see the world as a child with awe and wonder..the discoveries come every day and are burned on our brain as memories...I find that as I explore the flowers with a macro view and learn more bout the garden and gardening that awe and wonder returns and I am once agin wading in the creek, digging in the dirt and rolling down hills of wildflowers.

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  2. Ah yes, not to lose my sense of wonder, or if I do mislay it, then to find it again. Here on your post.

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  3. I think small children do see things differently to us, they are so full of wonder and magic and curiosity. It's a state of mind that I've rediscovered as I've got older. Those are really beautiful photographs.

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  4. Very interesting thought! One of my first memories is of playing in the dirt and seeing an enormous, big fat earthworm. Now I wonder exactly how big it was!

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  5. Short answer, yes! As children I'm sure we 'see big'. Wonderful images :D

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  6. I am enjoying all your photographs of flowers (especially the purple flowers)...

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  7. The incredible imagination you displayed as a youngster is still deeply reflected in your posts, quotes and photographs. You have never lost your Inner Child and that's a wonderful thing. Beautiful post - lovely pictures.

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    1. Such lovely words, thank you Astrid:~)

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  8. I just discovered your blog, very nice photos.

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    1. Thanks John, glad you are enjoying it:~)

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  9. Those foxgloves look good enough to eat - or drink - but then again maybe not if I want to live a little longer! So I'll just have to be content with 'looking' at this glorious set of images.

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  10. What a great thought--I love it. And lovely pictures, as always. I look forward to every post.

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  11. Thank you all as usual it is very heartening to hear such lovely kind words:~)

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  12. I don't know about you but the older I get the closer I want to see things. Thank goodness for the macro lens, it's opened up a whole new world for me :) Your photos are magical!

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  13. Thank you all so much, loved your comments today:~)

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  14. The top pic is my fave. And yes, children have macro eyes, just like I do (yes, I'm still a child at heart)....sometimes wish my photographic efforts would display that seeing!! LOL.

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A big thank you for all of your comments, each and every one is much appreciated and SO encouraging. Recently I have been struggling to respond to each one but I will catch up with you somewhere on the blogosphere in time! Please feel free to use the contact page if you have questions that require a response.