14.4.12

Our wildflower gift to the next generation



























Living in a protected wetland area I am constantly concerned about unwelcome and so called progress. One bit of progress I am delighted with though is the influence of the EU on habitat and species preservation. Older people around here have huge respect for the meandering landscape and it's evolvement over generations. Now our generation have responsibility for implementing conservation policies and we need to be equally sensitive and aware.

Recently, as agriculture grows in economic significance again, there are threats which could destroy the beauty and integrity of the country including land clearance, drainage, and over-grazing. The survival of sensitive areas now depends on current legislative protection.  I for one will be doing all I can to secure the future of these bluebells and other wildlife as an integral part of our exceptional and beautiful rural environment by supporting wilderness preservation.

Bluebells are not yet protected in Ireland but it is believed that they have declined in numbers due to excessive picking and the erosion of woodlands. What an uplifting sight they are every year at this time reminding us all of of childhood magic and the coming of summer. It's up to us to make sure that we can pass them on to future children and grandchildren.


Here is more information on Irelands endangered wildflowers.
Botanic Gardens







21 comments:

  1. Wetlands are protected in Michigan. I'm not sure about the rest of the American states. That wasn't always the case and we lost most of our wetlands to development. An ongoing gardening project is to 'enhance' the borders of the wetlands on our property with native plants to add some more color to the area.

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  2. These would be the proper English bluebells, not the Spanish ones? Or are there Irish bluebells? They are one of the plants also threatened by global weirding? Our flower pickers go after great bunches of arum lilies, but they seem still to survive in profusion. While there are seasonal wetlands for them.

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  3. Lovely and such an important cause. I have been a guilty flower picker in the past (I rarely pick even my garden flowers now and have mostly retired from flower arranging.) . . . joy for a few hours compared with as you say generations. I hope the native bluebells will be protected soon and that people will see that agriculture must leave way for our natural world. "I for one will be doing all I can to secure the future of these bluebells and other wildlife as an integral part of our exceptional and beautiful rural environment by supporting wilderness preservation." Brava! Brava!

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  4. I hope they will be able to protect the bluebells in Ireland so that they can regenerate and allow future generations to enjoy. There is nothing like visiting a bluebell wood in the spring.
    Sarah

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  5. Lovely post and so true, there is nothing more beautiful than leaving nature to do its own thing. Everyone should know the Leave no trace principles and take nothing but photographs :)

    All things nice...

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  6. Such a good point, and beautiful visual reminder. Your post sent me off to finally join up to support Plantlife. Small steps, but something.

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  7. Bluebells are my favourite spring flowers, they are protected here in the UK. I really hope Ireland will do the same.

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  8. Great post and a reminder to all of us. We have wetlands in our neighborhood, and they are protected. Beautiful bluebells! Love them!

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  9. This was an excellent post. The bluebells are beautiful.

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  10. We went for a walk to Renvile woods yesterday which, at this time of the year, is blanketed with old garlic and bluebells.
    The senses are wrecked by the time you get out f there ..... Smells of garlic and beautiful bluebells blinding our walk.
    I had no idea they were endangered. I will never pick them again and will start scolding others that do xx

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  11. It's illegal to even pick or dig up a bluebell here in Scotland unless the landowner gives permission. Ou problem here is keeping the spanish one that looks so similar out of rural gardens so that it doesn't interbreed with our native. Our bluebell wood nearby is about to burst into flower!

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  12. Here in Portugal , we have wetlands on the shores of the Tagus river that are protected areas for flora and fauna.
    Here in the area that i live in ..Alentejo, we dont have bluebells.
    They are such a daity beautiful flower and should be protected.
    I am going to see now what everyone calls the spanish bluebell.. Its Iberia.. it might exist here.
    Enjoyable post
    thank you
    Val

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  13. Like you I am trying to grow and preserve our native wildflowers that are weeds and nuisances to many....I would rather have them than any other flower...nice to see that there is work to preserve these areas in Ireland....so many beautiful places there......we try here but I think development wins and lawns replace woods and flowers...so sad.

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  14. Such a wonderful gift to future residents. What a shame they are on the decline, hope the initiative to save them becomes successful.

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  15. I remember when it was acceptable to dig up both bluebells (Scilla non-scripta) and native primroses (Primula vulgaris) in England - horror of horrors! Times have changed thankfully and I now grow the primroses from seed for my Pacific Northwest garden and ordered a hundred bluebell bulbs from a specialist grower in Wales many years ago.

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  16. I love bluebells and they do absolutely remind me of my childhood and cycling through a bluebell wood on the way to visit a friend of mine who lived in the country...at age 8! How times change.

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  17. I visited our local Bluebell wood at the weekend. There were lots of people there but happy to say no one was picking them.

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  18. For sheer joy, I would run through bluebell woods as a child and generations later they too are now under threat. Land development is the greatest destroyer of all habitats so thankful that there are grants to preserve pockets at least. Your camera has captured the blue hues so well.

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  19. A nice set of pictures Ms Lane...and a delight to read of your regard for the lovely environment in the south east of the auld sod...an auld sod that is so rich in flora and fauna.

    So good to meet up with you too...

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  20. Yes, those plants are valuable, and we need to make sure they are still there in the future.

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  21. Super pics, although the course sounds wonderful the pic quality has always been really good...especially on my lovely channel caster app where i have added your blog feed and it shows a mobile smartphone page full of pictures, lets me view each post and click straight through to the web version!!

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A big thank you for all of your comments, each and every one is much appreciated and SO encouraging. Recently I have been struggling to respond to each one but I will catch up with you somewhere on the blogosphere in time! Please feel free to use the contact page if you have questions that require a response.